Monday, June 14, 2010

Lloyds Report - Sustainable Energy Security: Strategic Risks and Opportunities for Business

Chatham House-Lloyd's 360 Risk Insight White Paper
by Antony Froggatt and Glada Lahn, June 2010

As the disaster in the Gulf of Mexico has amply demonstrated, growing global energy demand and the anticipated restricted availability of some conventional fossil fuels pose an escalating threat to the security of energy supply for global businesses. Sustainable Energy Security: Strategic Risks and Opportunities for Business, produced jointly by Chatham House and Lloyd's, reveals multiple vulnerabilities in our current energy system and urges both business strategists and government policy-makers to take into account a range of encroaching risks and be bold in making plans for a more resilient and low carbon energy future.



This report, jointly produced by Lloyd’s 360 Risk Insight programme and Chatham House, should cause all risk managers to pause. What it outlines, in stark detail, is that we have entered a period of deep uncertainty in how we will source energy for power, heat and mobility, and how much we will have to pay for it.

Is this any different from the normal volatility of the oil or gas markets? Yes, it is. Today, a number of pressures are combining: constraints on ‘easy to access’ oil; the environmental and political urgency of reducing carbon dioxide emissions; and a sharp rise in energy demand from the Asian economies, particularly China.

Executive Summary
  • Businesses which prepare for and take advantage of the new energy reality will prosper - failure to do so could be catastrophic
  • Market dynamics and environmental factors mean business can no longer rely on low cost traditional energy sources
  • China and growing Asian economies will play an increasingly important role in global energy security
  • We are heading towards a global oil supply crunch and price spike
  • Energy infrastructure will become increasingly vulnerable as a result of climate change and operations in harsher environments
  • Lack of global regulation on climate change is creating an environment of uncertainty for business, which is damaging investment plans
  • To manage increasing energy costs and carbon exposure businesses must reduce fossil fuel consumption
  • Business must address energy-related risks to supply chains and the increasing vulnerability of 'just-in-time' models
  • Investment in renewable energy and 'intelligent' infrastructure is booming. This revolution presents huge opportunities for new business partnerships
[via Transition Culture]

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